Mooncoin Places of Historical Interest.

Below is a list of places of historical interest assembled from various sources:

Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV - Mooncoin starts page 147

NIAH – National Inventory of Architectural Heritage - Historic Environment Viewer

Historical Ordnance Survey maps at GeoHive

Mooncoin Graveyards are documented separately

 

 

Place of interestGPSTypeFurther info
Corluddy Castle52.265157, -7.206391CastleFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 161
The Castle of Curluddy was well and strongly built, and, though roofless, is fairly perfect. It is divided by two stone arches, one over the second storey, the other over the fourth. There are five storeys in all. A long, narrow passage in the thickness of the wall over the first stone arch is known as "Phil Harvey's bed." This castle belonged to the Grants till Cromwell's time, when it was granted to one of the Usurper's followers named Jackson. Its situation, not on level ground, but on the sloping side of a hill, is very unusual. There is no trace of any enclosing wall or fosse. The land all around Curluddy castle and street is hilly and rocky. The glen underneath the castle was a marsh in living memory; it is said that an arm of the Suir ran through it of old, though this statement appears to be incredible. There is a well near the castle called Tubberageelish.
The Irish sound of Curluddy is Curluddha. O'Donovan's explanation of the name, i.e. Cor loda, round hill of the mire, is the only one forthcoming.
Grange Castle52.312446, -7.271481CastleFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 152
Grange Castle, in the village of the same name, was a square keep, roughly built. Three sides of it still remain to a height of about 25 ft. The ground storey was covered overhead by a strong stone and mortar arch, most of which has been broken away. The walls are 5½ ft. thick. This castle appears to be of considerable antiquity. In the 16th century and early part of the 17th, it was occupied by the Walshs. Its last occupant was one
Fripps.
Barrabehy Castle52.346624, -7.250447CastleFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 156
Barrabehy. — The castle of Barrabehy stood close to Barrabehy village, in the place called "the high woods" but there is not the slightest vestige of it now. John Walsh, of Barrabehy, gent., son and heir of William Walsh, of same, gent., died June 12th, 1635, and was buried in Tubrid. William, his son, born in 1607, succeeded to the family estate, forfeited under Cromwell, and was transplanted to Connaught in 1654
Kilcraggan Castle52.311423, -7.240998CastleFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 154
Called in Irish Kill-craggawin, the Church of the Rocky Land (Creagan). The church has been destroyed, probably for many centuries. The graveyard is still pointed out partly in a field of Richard Phelan's, and partly in the Crochteen, at Mr. O'Halloran's house. The church itself stood in the Crochteen. There is no holy well, nor tradition of a patron saint. Mr. O'Halloran's house is said to have been built, about 1690, by a Cromwellian family named Whitby. It was remodelled about 1850, when a third or top storey was taken down. Kilcraggan castle adjoined it on the north, extending thence, across a car-way, into Richard Phelan's land. This castle belonged to the Walshs in former times.
Pollrone CastleRoughly 52.288427, -7.275949CastleFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 151
Poulrone castle stood, it is said, close to the church, on the ground now occupied
by Mr. Edward Murphy's dwelling-house. In 1653, Edmund Grant, Irish Papist,
forfeited Polerone (a castle, a house, and a church) 423 ac. 2 r. 24 p., and part of
Ballaghgevan, (a subdivision of Dournane), 58 ac. 3 r. 32 p.
The 1653 Survey of the Lands Granted to the Countess of Ormond in Co. Kilkenny by Conleth Manning
Poulroan, arable and good pasture
Here is an old Castle ruined & some cabins whereof one has a chimney
Dournane Castle52.281972, -7.257930CastleFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 151
There was a castle here in former times, where the village pump is now.
Nothing is known of its history except that it belonged to the Ormond family.
Ballytarsney CastleGuess 52.300766, -7.254349CastleFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 154
In Irish Ballytarsney is called Bollia-hawrsna, that is, the townland across or athwart, or the cross townland. Close to Ballytarsney village there is a tract of 12 acres called Bawnnacushlawn, i.e. the castle field. No trace of the castle is now visible. Ballytarsney belonged to the Earls of Ormond in the 16th and 17th centuries.
The 1653 Survey of the Lands Granted to the Countess of Ormond in Co. Kilkenny by Conleth Manning
Ballytarsney
Here is an old ruined castle & some thatched cabins
Arderra CastleVery Roughly 52.312570, -7.229255CastleFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 157
Arderra castle stood on the outskirts of the village of Arderra, to the west,
till about 1820, when it was accidentaly burned down ; it was razed to the ground
soon after. It is commonly remembered as " Porter's castle," from a family of
the Porters who occupied it in the 18th century. The townland and castle belonged
to Colonel Hoyle Walsh, second son of Walter Walsh, Esq., of Castlehale, in the
middle of the 17th centurv. Colonel Walsh forfeited under Cromwell, but his
estate was afterwards restored to him. Thomas Walsh of Arderra was banished
to Connaught in 1654.
Afaddy - St Bridget's WellVery Roughly 52.318499, -7.258387Holy WellFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 154
In Irish this townland is called Nochfoddha i.e. An Ath Fada or the Long Ford. In the Fiants of Queen Elizabeth's reign, it is sometimes called Affady and sometimes Longford. There are here three very fine wells, within a few perches of each other, in a field to the left of the road from Mooncoin to Nicholastown. They spring up through vein of whitish, bright-coloured sand, which imparts a peculiar silvery transparency to their waters ; and, hence, their modern designation of the Silver Springs, which, under the singular form, has now become the name of the townland of An Ath Fada. One of these wells is holy; it is called Tubberavzheedha, i.e. Tiobarai Brigde, or St. Bridget's Well. There is another holy well, in Silverspring, on the right of the avenue from Silverspring House to the lodge gate; it is now much damaged; its name is "St. Patrick's Well."
Afaddy - St Patrick's WellVery Roughly 52.317342, -7.257961Holy Well
Clonmore - Toberaghcanice52.305741, -7.286894Holy Well
Corluddy - Tubberageelish52.264218, -7.207167Holy Well
Tubbrid Holy Well52.339217, -7.242599Holy WellFrom Carrigan: History and Antiquities of the Diocese of Ossory Vol IV page 156
Its Irish name is Tiobraid, which is here pronounced Tiubb-a-rid. It signifies a Well. The Parish Church of Tubrid was very small. Parts of the east gable and north side-wall still remain to a height of 6 ft.; they are about 2 ½ ft. thick, and are certainly very ancient. The only inscribed stone in the graveyard bears the name of Mathew Duggan, and the year 1787. The patron saint of the church is forgotten by the people. In the records of the Diocese, St Killocus, i.e. Ceallach, is made the patron, and his feast day is assigned to April 13th.
The great well to which the name of Tiobraid properly belongs, is about 150 yds. west of the church. It was formerly a holy well, but has ceased to be regarded as such for many years.
Rathkieran - Tober Kieran52.291516, -7.229185Holy Well
Ballygorey - Tobernakill52.269552, -7.245176Holy Well
Clonmore Glebe House52.317208, -7.298895House
Clonmore House52.302460, -7.288578House
Pollrone House52.289025, -7.278990House
Ballygorey - Suir Lodge (Windy House)52.264604, -7.243135House
Old Luffany - Butlers52.274394, -7.231416House
Waddingtown - Ashgrove House52.294875, -7.228789House
Silverspring House52.317838, -7.255067House
Clonconey House52.331602, -7.274443House
Graigavine House52.326674, -7.280010House
Rathcurby House52.300304, -7.208262House
Portnascully Old Mill52.276044, -7.243201Mill
Ballinlough Corn Mill52.282244, -7.225952Mill
Clogga Corn Mill52.328832, -7.252831Mill
Barrabehy Mill52.328832, -7.252831Mill
Portnascully Rath52.274886, -7.245411Rath
Barrabehy Ringfort52.343726, -7.243571Rath
Cashel Ringfort52.351472, -7.262810Rath
Killinaspick Ringfort52.352636, -7.257477Rath
Kilcraggan Ringfort52.305621, -7.245149Rath
Ballytarsney Enclosure52.305432, -7.259894Rath
Carrigeen Old School52.273774, -7.224226School
Clonmore School52.321375, -7.294679School
Clogga School52.335285, -7.238268School
Tubbrid Megalithic tomb - portal tomb52.343367, -7.239009Tomb1. Shaw-Mason, W. 1814-19 Statistical account or parochial survey of Ireland, 3 vols. Dublin. J. Cumming.
Licketstown Megalithic tomb52.254997, -7.210353Tomb
Rathcurby South Megalithic tomb52.302091, -7.206761Tomb
Waddingstown Souterrain52.298271, -7.230392